Editorial Team

Sohail Jannesari – Founder of Stolen Tools

Who are you?

I am Sohail Jannesari, a postdoctoral researcher working on outcomes for survivors of human trafficking and modern slavery. I am the project coordinator at Stolen Tools, convener of the Inspiring Ethics group, and project lead on a university-community collaboration developing a guide for mental health professionals working with Afghan sanctuary seekers. I founded the Migrant Connections Festival charity and co-founded the Cotton Tree Trust. Also, big up Speaking Statues, an anti-colonial group I started.

Why did you join Stolen Tools?

I started Stolen Tools because I was upset at the convoluted, opaque way journals worked and how hard it was to write about colonialism in the context of mental health without facing criticism and censure. Whenever I am unhappy with the way things are done, I end up killing myself trying to set up an alternative. I also wanted to support my colleagues having difficult experiences with racism in academia and being exploited as early career researchers.

How do you feel about racism?

What racism? I do not see any racism anywhere. Has anyone told Boris Johnson?? He will be shocked and appalled.

What is your role at Stolen Tools?

I am the project coordinator and began the project. I do all the following on a good day: arranging meetings, timetabling, recruiting, and onboarding people, funder reporting, promoting journal and liaising with courses, managing internal disputes, setting journal theme, and finalizing journal content, meeting minutes and summary, managing finances and getting people paid, applying for further funding, and budgeting.

What is your vision for Stolen Tools?

I want a journal that is powerful because it is read and respected by racialized minorities inside and outside of the university.  I want a journal that brings racialized minorities together in mutual respect and support. Oh, and I want a journal that subverts and destroys the current hierarchical and elitist academic system. Radical, angsty, solidarity vibes.

Ricardo Twumasi A picture containing a person and clothing, personDescription automatically generated

Who are you?

I’m a lecturer King’s College London, with a wide range of research interests including equality at work, discrimination and the application of machine learning to selection and assessment.

Why did you join Stolen Tools?

I joined the team after seeing all the fun and innovative ways Sohail managed to decolonise his lectures. I think we as an academic community can do better with the confusing and unequal system of publishing which favours established academics. Open peer review, supportive editing and giving value to research from racialised minorities are all parts of this journal I believe in.

How do you feel about racism?

Racism is a pernicious force in society which is one of the antecedents of genocide. This in group vs out group othering is one of the most toxic characteristics displayed by homo sapiens. Based on arbitrary, socially constructed distinctions divide and ruin peoples lives. Through education and intervention I hope our children can one day live in a world where the construct of race is as inconsequential as the construct and classification of blood type.

What is your vision for Stolen Tools?

I hope Stolen tools will be a place of chance not just against racism, but a revolution against many of the injustices of academic publishing.

Hanna Riazuddin A picture containing clothing, personDescription automatically generated

Who are you?

My name is Hana. I am a Ph.D. candidate in Geography at King’s College London. My academic and training are in the racial formations of modernity and contemporary society. I undertook an MSc in Post-colonial Studies, where I discovered a theoretical passion for Black Feminist scholarship and thinkers from the Black Radical Tradition. I am also a writer and the Director of The Body Narratives, a community arts-based organization that supports communities of colour through storytelling as a tool for community development and social action. But I have been involved in anti-racist work for over 15 years now in many different roles and guises!

Why did you join Stolen Tools?

I am excited to be a part of the Stolen Tools team and believe the journal will be a unique platform to support anti-racist work and thinking. But I am most passionate about the fact that we will be able to encourage anyone with an idea to develop their writing skills through our mentorship model.

What is your role at Stolen Tools?

As a creative mentor, I really look forward to hearing new creative voices and sharing the resources and tips I’ve learned along the way!

Rubbia Ali

Who are you?

Rubbia Ali. BSc. Psychology. MSc. Psychiatric research. PGDip. Cultural psychology and psychiatry. Current research worker at Kings College London

Why did you join Stolen Tools?

I have spent 5 years studying in academia and currently work at a university thus my adult life thus far has heavily been impacted and influenced by academia. This journal is unique in that it advocates for some of the most disadvantaged groups within this field. I find this to be empowering and feel proud to be working for such an incredible initiative.

How do you feel about racism?

Coming from an ethnic minoritized background has impacted me in many ways including professional progression thus I am passionate about seeking ways to combat this and all those it impacts.

What is your role at Stolen Tools?

Social media officer. I oversee the social media accounts for the journal and share updates with our amazing audience.

What is your vision for Stolen Tools?

I would love to see it being utilized as a global, mainstream journal that continues to shed light on inequalities that plague our systems in hopes of improvement.

Trevor Brooks

Who are you?

I'm Trevor, an Audio Visual Technician based at King’s College London (KCL)

Why did you join Stolen tools?

I joined Stolen Tools, as I see the journal as a great way to improve representation in academia for minority ethnic groups. As a non-academic, I feel it is crucial that others like me can see a route to publishing.

How do you feel about racism?

I believe racism is more prevalent today than it has ever been. The difference between today and the past is most racism is indirect. I feel the only way to impact racism is by educating the younger generations.

What is your role at Stolen Tools?

Website and Journal. I offer support and guidance on the technical aspects of the journal including the website and Journal workflow.

What is your vision for Stolen Tools?

In 5 years Stolen Tools will be a major disrupter in traditional publishing.

Hannah Abdalla

Who are you?

My name is Hannah Abdalla. I am currently a MSc student on the joint programme Health Policy, Planning and Financing (HPPF) at The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine & The London School of Economics. I currently work as a freelance data analyst and research assistant with a particular interest in the fields of Digital Healthcare, Mental Health Policy, and Access to Medicines.

Why did you join Stolen Tools?

Stolen tools stood out to me as a journal in pursuit of change-making. Specifically, my attention was caught by the message in tackling inequalities within Research and Academia. I believe that these fields face great challenges in supporting minorities from racialised backgrounds. Notably, these challenges in these institutions have existed for a while with little effort to improve outcomes from racist ideology and systems. Fundamentally, to decentralize power, marginalised voices must empower other marginalised voices to create their own spaces, systems and community to establish real change.

This is something that I am keen to be part of. I believe that Stolen Tools will be a platform in advocating for the voices of those ignored to be heard outside of the current system of knowledge. This platform, open to all to contribute, will enable many to speak their truth and share their insights and experiences on a scale that will resonate with many.

How do you feel about racism?

It is a deep-rooted problem; it is found in every layer of our society. The institutions that educate us are not innocent and often hold ideologies and systems that often do not serve those who are from minority & racialised backgrounds.

What is your role at Stolen Tools?

I am the Mentor Coordinator for Stolen Tools. I assist in supporting our authors from minority ethnic backgrounds in being matched with experts who also come from racialised and minority backgrounds in their chosen field/ area of study. This is to create a system whereby the authors are thoroughly supported by experts from similar backgrounds.

What is your vision for Stolen Tools?

I will work with Stolen Tools to create long-lasting change, ensuring that Stolen Tools becomes a platform to guide, advocate and support the ideas of the underrepresented and marginalised.

Ayush Verma

Who are you?

My name is Ayush Verma and I’m 2nd Year International Development Student at KCL. I am also an artist and creative based in London, and have been working on commissions for the past couple years.

Why did you join Stolen Tools?

I joined stolen tools as the magazine felt like extremely personal to me. As a person of colour, in particular Indian/South Asian, decolonisation is a matter extremely relevant to my personal history due to how prevalent the impacts of colonialism still are within Indian culture and history today. As a student tackling a degree based on global development, decolonisation in the context of academia is especially important to me, as it shapes many of the ideas and theories I tackle on a day to day

How do you feel about racism?

As someone who experienced racism, either direct forms or subtle ones, I am certain of its prevalence today. In particular I think it is rampant in many of our institutions and global systems (with a key example of the curriculum and academia) and in turn influences and drives inequalities between different races and classes. From our global leaders to the local bartender, racism is found everywhere and anywhere and it damages POC like me on a daily basis (whether it is upfront or hidden)

What is your role at Stolen Tools?

I am the art coordinator at ST and my job has 2 key areas. Firstly, I network and source artwork from POC artists for the magazine. I am extremely passionate about this because I know first hand as an artist how hard it is to find commissions or magazines to accept your work- particularly if you don’t have contacts in the art world (which is also an area POC are very underrepresented). The role hence gives me the opportunity to not only showcase and represent POC artists but to also fairly pay them and accredit them. Secondly, I also work on producing designs and templates for the magazine, as a I like to deliver a cohesive visual product.

What is your vision for Stolen Tools?

Of course, I hope that that the journal is read by as many people as possible and gains popularity, but the biggest thing for me is that I hope it maintains the strong sense of empowerment and integrity the project was started on. I hope that in years to come, Stolen tool above all else continues to focus around POC writers and artists and continues to act as vehicle for representation and empowerment for marginalised communities.

Gabrielle Nieuwoudt

Who are you?

I am Gabi (she/her), a queer South African woman of colour living with Bipolar Disorder and ADHD. I am completing my MSc in Mental Health Studies at King’s College London and am an advocate for all things intersectionality.

Why did you join Stolen Tools?

In the words of Desmond Tutu, a fellow South African, “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.” I will not be neutral.

How do you feel about racism?

I was born five years after the fall of Apartheid. I grew up knowing nothing else but racism. But I also grew up watching the Rainbow Nation slowly blossom under the care of South Africans of colour who held onto hope. So, while I feel many things about racism and those who benefit under the systems of racism, I also feel hope that we can and will see radical change.

What is your role at Stolen Tools?

My role at Stolen Tools is Advisory Board Coordinator.

What is your vision for Stolen Tools?

My vision for Stolen Tools is that, together, we revolutionise how knowledge is shared and understood.